February 15, 2018

Another step towards guaranteed funding for TAFE

The Stop TAFE Cuts team

The Stop TAFE Cuts campaign took another step towards guaranteed funding for TAFE on the weekend.

South Australian Premier Jay Weatherill committed to guarantee a minimum 70 per centof VET fundingto TAFE.

This announcement follows similar commitments for two thirds or 70 per centfunding guarantees for TAFE from the Australian Labor Party federally, and the Labor Party in three other jurisdictions – NSW, the ACT and Tasmania.

Meanwhile, total government recurrent funding has declined by 26% since 2012; government payments to non-TAFE providers have more than doubled since 2007 and government expenditure per annual hour of training has decreased by 15 per cent.

The Turnbull government’s only plan is to fund vocational education through levies on visas - a strategy that business groups, unions and many politicians say is certain to fail.

In this difficult climate for TAFE – it is vital that we redouble our efforts in campaigning.

Stop TAFE Cuts supporters can support the campaign going by contacting politicians and asking them to sign our funding guarantee (and sending us a photo!).For those politicians whose party has committed to a 70 per cent or two thirds funding guarantee, signing an individual guarantee demonstrates they understand the importance of guaranteed funding for TAFE.

Where there is not yet a commitment to the guarantee, it is still important to speak to or write to your local MP and ask them what their plan is for TAFE. Let them know that TAFE is important to you and the majority of the electorate.

TAFE is too good to lose, and we need to remind all politicians of that.

Guaranteed funding for TAFE is the first step in securing its future.

We need politicians to stand up and speak up for TAFE.

Does your MP support guaranteed funding for TAFE

Does your MP support guaranteed funding for TAFE

The TAFE sector is the lowest funded education sector and funding has declined by more than 24% since 2008. As privatization of the sector has increased, and as more and more government funding has gone to private for profit providers ...
Seismic changes in TAFE

Seismic changes in TAFE

In 2017 TAFE is at the brink of seismic change. Over the last five years intensified marketisation of the vocational education sector, the uncapping of undergraduate degree funding and the decline of TAFE-based vocational education programs for schools have brought TAFE institutions to the brink of insolvency and incapacity.
PaTH: confusing acronym, shoddy programme

PaTH: confusing acronym, shoddy programme

PaTH stands for Prepare, Trial and Hire. It targets young job seekers, and claims to assist them into paid employment. The model works by providing pre-employment training (Prepare); followed by “internships” (Trial)...
The Future of the TAFE system

The Future of the TAFE system

May was a big month for the vocational education sector. First, the Commonwealth Government has indicated it will scrap the National Partnership Agreement with the States and instead establish a skills fund dependent on host worker visa fees. This implies another significant funding cut for TAFE.
Reimagining gender equity in trades

Reimagining gender equity in trades

Over the last three years Victoria University’s Work-based Education Research Centre (WERC) team has undertaken a series of studies into the recruitment and retention of women in traditionally male trades such as automotive and electrical. In our most recent research we investigated the experiences of tradeswomen and female apprentices in the electrical and electro technology industry. In this article I’m going to discuss a few of our findings including some implications for TAFE teaching.
Art attack – time to reverse government cuts to arts education

Art attack – time to reverse government cuts to arts education

TAFE Colleges, and their predecessors, have long fostered the growth of Australian artists, and the cultural and artistic landscape in Australia. From pre-eminent Australian painters such as Sidney Nolan and John Olsen to street and contemporary artists like Rone and Tracey Moffat; musicians and bands such as Augie March and Troy Casser-Daly; fashion designers from Akira, to J’Aton Couture to Lisa Ho; filmmakers, animators, dancers, writers – so many of the talented people who have shaped Australia went to TAFE.
The 2017 Federal Budget cut funding to TAFE and vocational education

The 2017 Federal Budget cut funding to TAFE and vocational education

The 2017 Federal Budget delivered nothing for TAFE or TAFE students, and is a continuation of the Turnbull Government’s attack on the sector, and its failure to provide policy leadership or support.
New VET Student Loans don't solve the problems with income contingent loans

New VET Student Loans don't solve the problems with income contingent loans

In December 2016, the notorious VET FEE-HELP scheme was replaced with a new scheme – VET Student Loans. The Minister for Education and Training, Senator Simon Birmingham, claimed the new scheme would “secure the future and reputation of Australia’s high quality vocational education and training system.”
TAFE must be the foundation

TAFE must be the foundation

Have hope, the Vocational Education and Training system has finally reached the bottom and government, industry, peak training organisations and policy makers are ready to start the long climb out of the hole dug by failed policies. They simply need a ladder.
Vocational education in an international context

Vocational education in an international context

Vocational education is distinctively embedded in its context. The curriculum for schools and higher education either comes from the education system or it originates from occupations but is strongly reinterpreted by educationalists.